Archive for the ‘Geocaching Beginners’ Category

I found this video on the official geocaching blog and it really tied into what I was talking about in my last post. Introducing the hobby of geocaching to a friend or family member can be a fulfilling experience. Explaining what geocaching is all about is definitely not as rewarding or fun than getting out and showing them instead.

Even experienced geocachers who have found thousands of caches were still a newbie at one point. However, over time, geocachers can slowly gain vital experience through their previous adventures to find out what types of geocaches work and which ones do not. These experiences can lead to a more pleasant geocaching adventure.

So, whether you’re still anticipating your first GPS-enabled treasure hunt or you’ve been caching for years, there’s still a thrill to seek for everyone.

 

What do you think? Do you plan on introducing someone to geocaching? Have you done so already? Leave a comment and let me know!

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Admit it: We’ve all searched for geocaches high and low and cannot seem to close the find. Finally, you zero in on the cache and say to yourself, “Why didn’t I look there in the first place?”

Don’t fret! There are some precautions you can take to to assure yourself that you are looking in the right location.

  1. If possible, do not rely on only one GPS device. If you have two or three GPS-enabled devices, they will all give you a better estimate on where the geocache is hiding. Remember, GPS devices are more accurate when you are in motion (walking, bicycling, etc.). If you stand still and stare at the screen, you’ll find your compass jumping in different directions. Nowadays, many smart phone devices provide applications for geocaching, which can be helpful if your GPS is not cooperating.
  2. Pretend you are the hider. If you were the cache owner, where would you hide it? Often times, you’d be surprised how obvious this might be. If you stop and look at the surrounding area, look for a clue that might be suspicious. This might be a pile of rocks, a small path of footprints, or a point of reference in a prominent area.
  3. Communicate with previous finders. If you know you will be looking for a difficult cache, it might be beneficial to talk to geocachers who have already located the cache. They don’t have to spoil the fun, but they can provide some insightful hints to help you find it.

Still can’t find it?

If you were unable to locate the geocache, there is a possibility it may have disappeared. It is important to notify the owner on the cache website if you did not find the cache because it will help the owner decide if they need to go check on it and replace it if needed.

I’m curious, though. Do you log a ‘Did Not Find’ on the website if you couldn’t locate it?

Happy Caching!

Not all geocaches are created equal.

If you live in a high-populated city, it’s likely that urban geocaches are up your alley. However, if you live in a small, secluded town, most geocaches are found deep in the forest or on mountain trails. There are specific containers, terrains, and creativity that comes with either an urban or a nature cache and there are specific clues that you should look for during your hunt.

ErikaJean

The Urban Cache:

  • Usually a small container
  • Sometimes can be magnetic that is attached to electrical boxes, fences, or road signs
  • Blends in very well with its environment
  • You must act natural during the hunt so non-geocachers don’t think you’re up to something suspicious
  • Usually found in parking lots, public parks or near buildings

The Nature Cache:

A cache found deep in the forest of Clear Creek, PA.

  • Usually a larger container
  • Mostly found under a pile of rocks or in a tree
  • Do not have to worry about “muggles” or non-geocachers
  • Brings you to a beautiful or interesting place

After gaining some experience with finding urban and nature geocaches, it will become easier to decide what kind of finds you enjoy or which ones you find more difficult.

For more information on geocache containers, or if you are interested in buying a custom geocache container, you can visit the Cache Box Store .

What do you think?

Which kind of geocaching do you prefer to hunt? Which kind of geocaching is more challenging to you? Leave a comment and let me know!

In the geocaching world, acronyms are used online to describe a geocaching experience, issue or suggestion to the cache owner. As a beginner, there will be terms that you might be unaware of. It is crucial to learn these terms because they can help immensely when you want to look up information on a specific cache you’re looking for.

Basic Geocaching Acronyms:

  • BYOP– Bring your own Pen/Pencil. Some micro geocaches are too small to store a writing utensil and will be helpful to bring one with you to sign the logbook inside of the cache.
  • DNF– Did Not Find. If a geocacher could not find the geocache, they will write this acronym on the cache site to alert the cache owner that it may have disappeared.
  • FTF– First To Find. When a new geocache is submitted online, geocachers compete to see who can find the geocache first and be the first person to sign the log. Sometimes, the cache owner will leave money in the cache and whoever finds it first will take the money.
  • Muggle– A non-geocacher.
  • TFTC– Thanks For The Cache. This common acronym is used when geocachers log their find.
  • TNSL-Took Nothing. Signed Logbook.

Visit the Geocaching Glossary for more information!

What do you think?

Do you use acronyms in your log entries? What other geocaching acronyms are out there? Leave a comment and let me know!

A geocache in Butler, PA

Geocaches are everywhere. We probably walk by them everyday without even knowing they exist. In my opinion, they serve one important purpose: To stop and realize the little things in life.

When I go geocaching, there are a few things I keep in mind:

1. Don’t look obvious. Wandering around aimlessly with a GPS in front of your face can make you look suspicious to non-geocachers (aka “Muggles”). If you’re searching in a high-populated area, you must be stealthy and act natural.

2. It’s not about what you find. The trinkets and logbook that are stashed inside a geocache are fun to look at, but that’s not the reason I enjoy geocaching. It’s about the thrill of hunting for buried treasure, and the satisfaction of the find.

3. Relax and enjoy your surroundings. Geocaching is meant to share beautiful,scenic views with others who want to experience your favorite places. After finding the cache you’ve worked hard to find, take a moment to look around and enjoy the destination.

A geocache in Butler, PA

New to Geocaching?

Here are some things you’ll need:

  • A pen or pencil to sign logbooks
  • Sneakers
  • Plenty of water
  • Trade items to leave inside a geocache

That’s it! So what are you waiting for? Get outside and start exploring!

What do you think?

What items do you bring when you go geocaching? Leave a comment and let me know!

    Geocaching, as defined by Wikipedia, is an outdoor activity in which the participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver or other navigational techniques to discover containers, called “geocaches” or “caches”, anywhere in the world.

    There are over 1 million hidden geocaches in the world, just waiting to be found. To start geocaching, just go to the Official Geocaching Website, create a free basic membership, and then click on the “Hide & Seek A Cache” tab. From there, you can look up the nearest caches by entering a zip code, address, or latitude/longitude coordinates. Once you discover a cache you want to find, grab your GPS and head outside!

    Geocaching can range from an easy “park and grab”, to a difficult hike or climb. But don’t sweat! Every geocache is rated by difficulty and terrain on the website.

    Once you find a geocache container, sign the log book and admire the goodies and trade items that are stashed inside.

    The rules are simple:

    • If you take an item from a geocache, please leave something in return for the next geocacher to find
    • Return the geocache to its original hiding place
    • Log your experience at geocaching.com

    Here’s a video to sum it all up:

    Geocaching is a rewarding experience and is an unusual way to explore your community, discover beautiful scenic views, and travel outdoors. Happy Caching!

    What do you think?

    Have you ever been geocaching before? How did you first hear about geocaching? Leave a comment and let me know!