Posts Tagged ‘geocache’

It’s always a joy to find a geocache, but sometimes the container can become repetitive or ordinary. When I discover a geocache in a unique container, the experience becomes more memorable instantly. They are the kind of finds that I like to tell my friends and family about and I love when I find them unexpectedly. Creative containers don’t have to be complex and difficult to hide. Today I’ll share with you some creative ideas for creating containers at home, or where you can pick one up for cheap.

Creatively Camouflaged

Rock geocache container

I found this creative cache container at my local REI store, and I think it is the perfect container for those who are looking for a container that is both sturdy and unique. I hid one myself and it has lasted through heavy weather conditions. It blends in perfectly with most environments and is a fun treat to find!

Do-It-Yourself

Log Geocache

If you don’t have the cash to buy a cache, you can easily make one at home! Just drill a hole into anything you think would make a good container (does it blend in well with the environment? will it protect the log from storms?) and seal it up! That’s it!

Want to see the most creative cache I’ve found so far?

I found this one when I was visiting family in Tampa, FL. The GPS took me to an old shed located next to a baseball field. The size of the container was not specified the hint was “not a glue.” As I was searching near an electrical box, I noticed a pipe coming from the ground with a gardening hose attached. I pulled the pipe right up from the ground and found the cache inside. So clever!

Do you make and hide creative caches? What is the most creative cache you have found? Leave a comment and let me know!

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I’ve been trying to catch up on my geocaching before it gets too hot to be away from the AC for more than five minutes. Here’s what I’ve found in the last few weeks:

This cache was in a beautiful area. The title was “Power Point” (GC31T0Q) and it was, you guessed it, stuck to an electrical box. I definitely had to spend a little time looking for it, though. All in all, it was a blast!

Next up:

This one (GCA4T4) was so much fun. It was located in a little park that I never knew existed. It was just your average container, but I really had fun searching for it. I was riding my bike with family and when I checked for nearby caches…voila! It was 300 feet away (Don’t you love when that happens?)

I loved this one:

This was within walking distance from my house, so I decided to bike to the spot during sunset. SG1 (GC2E459) was the perfect combination of business and pleasure. It was definitely not easy to find, but it was so exciting to find it in an untraditional spot. I really enjoyed it.

Lastly,

This was the tiniest geocache I’ve ever seen! It didn’t even have a container. The log was simply hidden in a bolt of a street sign. It’s named “Get Outside #3” (GC2ERMJ) and I definitely needed to pull out my tweezers for this one!

I’d like to know….

What geocaches have you found lately? What type of geocache is your favorite to find? Write a comment and let me know!

Happy Caching!

 

After discovering this well-hidden geocache in a highly-populated area, it definitely made me stop and notice my surroundings. You see, I stroll down this road almost every day to get to class and I have never noticed this tiny piece of history, until now. I was shocked to find out there is a sneaky geocache right in the middle of traffic, busy college students and chaos.

The Story of George (GC1MD2W) is a geocache dedicated to the George ditch in Tempe, Ariz.

This ditch was dug by Benjamin and Virginia George in 1883 to bring water to their Tempe ranch. Most of the ditch is covered and piped today, but this small section of the ditch that still remains is a remnant of what ditches looked like around the Valley in those days. And sure enough, it’s a perfect hiding place, too!

This geocache really made me open my eyes to the world around me and took me to a place where I can have fun and learn at the same time!


So Tell me…
Where do you like to geocache?

So, tell me…

Where do you like to geocache? Have you ever discovered something interesting from geocaching? I’d love to hear from you!

What is geocaching? CLICK HERE!

Admit it: We’ve all searched for geocaches high and low and cannot seem to close the find. Finally, you zero in on the cache and say to yourself, “Why didn’t I look there in the first place?”

Don’t fret! There are some precautions you can take to to assure yourself that you are looking in the right location.

  1. If possible, do not rely on only one GPS device. If you have two or three GPS-enabled devices, they will all give you a better estimate on where the geocache is hiding. Remember, GPS devices are more accurate when you are in motion (walking, bicycling, etc.). If you stand still and stare at the screen, you’ll find your compass jumping in different directions. Nowadays, many smart phone devices provide applications for geocaching, which can be helpful if your GPS is not cooperating.
  2. Pretend you are the hider. If you were the cache owner, where would you hide it? Often times, you’d be surprised how obvious this might be. If you stop and look at the surrounding area, look for a clue that might be suspicious. This might be a pile of rocks, a small path of footprints, or a point of reference in a prominent area.
  3. Communicate with previous finders. If you know you will be looking for a difficult cache, it might be beneficial to talk to geocachers who have already located the cache. They don’t have to spoil the fun, but they can provide some insightful hints to help you find it.

Still can’t find it?

If you were unable to locate the geocache, there is a possibility it may have disappeared. It is important to notify the owner on the cache website if you did not find the cache because it will help the owner decide if they need to go check on it and replace it if needed.

I’m curious, though. Do you log a ‘Did Not Find’ on the website if you couldn’t locate it?

Happy Caching!

Travel Bugs

Posted: September 29, 2010 in Geocaching Adventures
Tags: , ,

What are they, you ask?

Travel bugs are objects that travel from cache to cache and are tracked on geocaching.com to see where they have visited.

Here’s a clip about a travel bug’s journey around the world:

What do you think?

Have you ever found and tracked a travel bug? Leave a comment and let me know!

Not all geocaches are created equal.

If you live in a high-populated city, it’s likely that urban geocaches are up your alley. However, if you live in a small, secluded town, most geocaches are found deep in the forest or on mountain trails. There are specific containers, terrains, and creativity that comes with either an urban or a nature cache and there are specific clues that you should look for during your hunt.

ErikaJean

The Urban Cache:

  • Usually a small container
  • Sometimes can be magnetic that is attached to electrical boxes, fences, or road signs
  • Blends in very well with its environment
  • You must act natural during the hunt so non-geocachers don’t think you’re up to something suspicious
  • Usually found in parking lots, public parks or near buildings

The Nature Cache:

A cache found deep in the forest of Clear Creek, PA.

  • Usually a larger container
  • Mostly found under a pile of rocks or in a tree
  • Do not have to worry about “muggles” or non-geocachers
  • Brings you to a beautiful or interesting place

After gaining some experience with finding urban and nature geocaches, it will become easier to decide what kind of finds you enjoy or which ones you find more difficult.

For more information on geocache containers, or if you are interested in buying a custom geocache container, you can visit the Cache Box Store .

What do you think?

Which kind of geocaching do you prefer to hunt? Which kind of geocaching is more challenging to you? Leave a comment and let me know!

In the geocaching world, acronyms are used online to describe a geocaching experience, issue or suggestion to the cache owner. As a beginner, there will be terms that you might be unaware of. It is crucial to learn these terms because they can help immensely when you want to look up information on a specific cache you’re looking for.

Basic Geocaching Acronyms:

  • BYOP– Bring your own Pen/Pencil. Some micro geocaches are too small to store a writing utensil and will be helpful to bring one with you to sign the logbook inside of the cache.
  • DNF– Did Not Find. If a geocacher could not find the geocache, they will write this acronym on the cache site to alert the cache owner that it may have disappeared.
  • FTF– First To Find. When a new geocache is submitted online, geocachers compete to see who can find the geocache first and be the first person to sign the log. Sometimes, the cache owner will leave money in the cache and whoever finds it first will take the money.
  • Muggle– A non-geocacher.
  • TFTC– Thanks For The Cache. This common acronym is used when geocachers log their find.
  • TNSL-Took Nothing. Signed Logbook.

Visit the Geocaching Glossary for more information!

What do you think?

Do you use acronyms in your log entries? What other geocaching acronyms are out there? Leave a comment and let me know!